StatCrunch logo (home)

Report Properties
Thumbnail:

from Flickr
Created: Dec 3, 2019
Share: yes
Views: 15
Tags:
 
Results in this report
 
Data sets in this report
 
Need help?
To copy selected text, right click to Copy or choose the Copy option under your browser's Edit menu. Text copied in this manner can be pasted directly into most documents with formatting maintained.
To copy selected graphs, right click on the graph to Copy. When pasting into a document, make sure to paste the graph content rather than a link to the graph. For example, to paste in MS Word choose Edit > Paste Special, and select the Device Independent Bitmap option.
You can now also Mail results and reports. The email may contain a simple link to the StatCrunch site or the complete output with data and graphics attached. In addition to being a great way to deliver output to someone else, this is also a great way to save your own hard copy. To try it out, simply click on the Mail link.
PHASE TWO: Flagler College Students and Cell Phones in Fall 2019
Mail   Print   Twitter   Facebook

Introduction:

On the first phase of this project, descriptive statistics were used to explore the cell phone use of a sample of 150 Flagler College students from fall semester 2016.  The first phase answered summary questions, such as “On average, how many minutes a day do you use your cell phone?” and “Do you think it’s important to your social life to always be “connected” to friends via your cell phone?”. On this phase of the report, three questions will be explored based on the sample results to investigate the association between three different pairs of data.

The three questions are:

1. Do students with iPhones spend more minutes on their cell phones daily?

2. Do students who have parental controls feel less connected than students who do not have parental controls?

3. Are male or female students more likely to find their cell phones addicting?

Question #1: Do students with iPhones spend more minutes on their cell phones daily? 

The majority of the students in the sample have iPhones; 85.33% of the students reported having an iPhone while 12% have androids and 2.67% reported having another type of cell phone. A pie chart representing this result is given below.

Result 1 - Type of cell phone

Result 1: Result 1- Type of Cell Phone   [Info]
Right click to copy


The following stacked boxplots and corresponding summary statistics represent the minutes spent on their cell phones per day between those students who report having an iPhone, an Android or other types of phone.


Result 2 - Stacked Boxplots

Result 2: Result 2 - Minutes spent on cell phone per day between types of cell phones   [Info]
Right click to copy

 

Result 3 - Summary Stats -  Minutes on cell phone vs. type of cell phone 

Result 3: Result 3 - Summary Statistics   [Info]

Summary statistics for Minutes on Cell Phone:


Group by: Type of Cell Phone
Type of Cell PhonenMinQ1MedianQ3MaxIQR
Android186015019024030090
Other4103580200300165
iPhone1280120180275300155

 

Overall, there is little difference in the minutes spent on cell phones between Android and iPhone users, however there is a bigger difference between these two groups and those who reported other.There were 128 students who reported currently using an iPhone, 18 students using an Android and 4 students who reported other.The median number of minutes for those who use an iPhone is 180 minutes a day and the median for android users is 190 minutes a day. Those who reported using a different type of cell phone (other) had a median of 80 minutes of cell phone use a day.  The lower and upper quartiles for iPhone users is 120 minutes and 275 minutes respectively. Creating an interquartile range of 155 minutes for iPhone uses. The lower and upper quartiles for Android users in 150 and 240 minutes respectively, with an interquartile range of 90 minutes for Android users. The lower and upper quartiles for other cell phones was 35 and 200 minutes respectively. Creating the largest interquartile range of 165 minutes. So, the interquartile range for iPhone and Other phone types are relatively similar with 155 and 165 minutes respectively.However the interquartile range for Android users was much different at 90 minutes.  Hence, the variability is similar for iPhone and other users but not for Android users. All three types of cell phones have different results  for all summary statistics except for the maximum which is 300 minutes for all three types of phones. 

Therefore, based on these sample results, it can be concluded that the students in the sample who reported having an iPhone do not spend a lot more time (minutes) than students with Androids but both spend a lot more time than students who report using a different type of phone (other). 

Question #2: Do students who have parental controls on their phones feel it is important to their social life to be connected to friends via cellphone more than  students without parental controls? 

Most of the students surveyed reported not having parental controls enabled;only 34 students out ofthe 150 students surveyed reported having parental controls enabled while 116 did not. The data showed that people who reported not having parental controls is 77.33% and the percentage of students who reported having parental controls is 22.67%.  A pie chart representing this result is given below.

Result 4: Result 4 -Parental controls 


Result 4: Result 4 - Parental Controls Pie Chart   [Info]
Right click to copy


To answer the question, a pie chart was created representing  if students have parental controls. 22.67% of students reported having parental controls enabled while 77.33% reported they did not.


Result 5: Result 5 - Connected vs. Parental Controls


Result 5: Results 5 - Connected vs. Parental Controls Bar Graph   [Info]
Right click to copy


According to these results, of students who did not have parental controls enabled,55.2% felt it was important to their social life to stay connected via cell phone while 44.8% of those students said it was not important to their social life. Of students with parental controls enabled, 70.6% of students felt it was important to their social life to stay connected via cell phone while 29.4% felt it was not important to their social lives to stay connected via cellphone.

Now to address the question, it was found that 70.6% of those students who reported having parental controls on their phone feel it is important to their social life to stay connected via cell phone, as compared to 55.2% of the group without parental controls that feel it is important to their social life to stay connected. 

 Therefore, based on the sample results, it can be concluded that of the students surveyed, those who have parental controls feel a greater need to stay connected via cell phone than students without parental controls. 

Question #3: Are male or female students more likely to find their cell phones addicting? 

The sample of students consisted of 109 females and 41 males.  A pie chart representing the distribution of gender of the students in the sample is presented below.

Result 6: Result 6 - Gender 

 

Result 6: Results 6 - Gender   [Info]
Right click to copy


To answer the question, a contingency table was created with the gender of the students represented as the row variable and the self-reported answer to “Do you think cell phone use is addictive?” as the column variable.


Result 7: Result 7 - Contingency Table

 

Result 7: Result 7 - Contingency table (with data)   [Info]

Contingency table results:


Rows: Gender
Columns: Addictive
NoYesTotal
Female5104109
Male73441
Total12138150

Chi-Square test:


StatisticDFValueP-value
Chi-square16.31086620.012
Warning: over 20% of cells have an expected count less than 5.
Chi-Square suspect.


Overall, 92% of the students (138 out of the 150) reported that they think cell phone use is addicting.  Of the males, a total of 82.9% (34 out of 41 males) reported that cell phone use is addicting. Of the females, 95.4% (104 out of the 109 females) reported that cell phone use is addicting.

 

Therefore, based on these sample results, it can be concluded that of the students in the sample, the female students are more likely than the male students to believe that cell phone use is addicting.


Data set 1. Section B - Liz, Joshua, and Madison - Flagler Col   [Info]
To analyze this data, please sign in.

 

HTML link:
<A href="https://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/viewreport.php?reportid=94232">PHASE TWO: Flagler College Students and Cell Phones in Fall 2019</A>

Comments
Want to comment? Subscribe
Already a member? Sign in.

Always Learning