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Owner: dwalker865
Created: Nov 6, 2018
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Phase 2: Flagler College Students and Required Summer/Winter Read - Walker, Destiny; Trybula, Megan; Love, Laurie (11AM)
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Introduction


On the first phase of this project, the opinion on summer reading of 150 Flagler College students from fall semester 2018 was explored. In this phase of the report, this same sample of 150 students will be divided into two smaller samples. The two samples are the sample of Flagler College students who did not attend academic sessions and the sample of Flagler College students who did attend academic sessions. For purposes of this report, the two samples will be defined with a simple phrase.  The term “Attendees” will define the sample of those Flagler College students who attended the academic sessions during orientation and the term “Non-attendees” will refer to the sample of those Flagler College students who did not attend academic sessions during orientation. There are 56.7 attendees and 43.3 non-attendees sampled.

 

Result 1: Students Who Attended Academic Sessions and Those Who Did Not Attend


Students surveyed answered many other questions.They reported the number of hours they came in to Flagler with, opinion on a written assessment and if they feel that they found common ground from their reading assignment.  In this report, three comparisons will be investigated.  First, a comparison will be made between the reported opinion on written assessments based on the summer reading between attendees and non-attendees.Then the responses to transferred credits and common ground will be compared to attendees and non-attendees.


Comparison #1:


The following stacked boxplots and corresponding summary statistics represent the college credits transferred in for the Attendees and Non-Attendees.  

Overall, there was not much of a difference in the reported credits transferred in with between attendees and non-attendees.  The median credits transferred in with for the Attendee was 3 credits per day and the median hours spent on social media for the Unsocial Students was 3 hours per day.  This is not significantly different. The upper and lower quartiles for the samples were not the same. Attendees had a lower limit of 0 and an upper limit of 15, while non-attendees had a lower limit of 0 and an upper limit of 20. The minimum and maximum number of hours on social media per day were the same (at 0 and between 75 credits respectively). Both sample distributions had outliers. In fact, the upper fence of 20 hours for the Non-Attendees was greater than the upper fence of 15 hours for the Attendees. This goes against my intuition that the Attendees would have transferred in with more credits than the non-attendees.  Furthermore, the variability of the responses is similar between the two groups based on an IQR between 15 and 20 for both samples. Therefore, it seems that regardless of the amount of students’ credits transferred in, there is no real difference between attendees and non-attendees.


Result #2: Box Plot


Result #3: Summary Stats

Summary statistics for Transferred Credits:

Group by: Academic Sessions

Academic Sessions

n

Min

Q1

Median

Q3

Max

IQR

No

85

0

0

3

20

75

20

Yes

65

0

0

3

15

75

15



Comparison #2:


The following split bar plot shows that Attendees and Non-Attendees did not differ too much in their responses to written assessments following their summer reading assignment. Approximately 80-90% of both groups do not want a written assessment based off of the summer reading project and approximately 7-17% of both groups liked the idea. This is certainly an interesting result. Regardless of a students’ opinion on the written assessment following their summer reading assignment, most students do not want a writing assignment.  


Result #4 : Attendees vs Written Assessment




Comparison #3:


The following contingency table compares the responses of students who found common ground between attendees and non attendees. Overall, 84 out of the 150 students surveyed believe that they found a common ground while 66 students do not. Thus, 56% (84/150) of all the students surveyed feel they did not find common ground. Therefore, the majority of the students surveyed feel they did not find common ground between the attendees and the non attendees.

Of the 85 Non-Attendees surveyed, 41 feel they did find a common ground and of the 65 Attendees surveyed, 43 feel they did find a common ground.  That is, 48.2% (41/85) of the Non-Attendees feel they did not find common ground while 66.2% (43/65) of the Attendees feel they did find common ground.  Thus, approximately 18% more of the Attendees feel they have common ground.


Result #5

Contingency table results:

Rows: Academic Sessions

Columns: Common Ground?

 

No

Yes

Total

No

44

41

85

Yes

22

43

65

Total

66

84

150


Chi-Square test:

Statistic

DF

Value

P-value

Chi-square

1

4.7996122

0.0285


Conclusion


In this comparison of the students who attended academic and those students who did not attend academic sessions, it was found that these two groups did not differ attendance based on the amount of credits they had transferred.It was found, though, that the two groups did differ in their opinion on is a written assessment should be included.  Majority of the students who did not attend the academic sessions felt the written assessments were not necessary, whereas the students surveyed who attended academic sessions felt the written assessments were necessary.  This is not surprising. If a student feels that academic sessions are not necessary for understanding the reading assignment, then they are more likely to oppose a written assessment based off of the material.

HTML link:
<A href="https://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/viewreport.php?reportid=82110">Phase 2: Flagler College Students and Required Summer/Winter Read - Walker, Destiny; Trybula, Megan; Love, Laurie (11AM)</A>

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