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Created: Nov 1, 2018
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PHASE TWO: Flagler College Students and Divorce - Lampp, Palmieri, Porto
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Introduction:

 

On the first phase of this project, we explored the demographic of Flagler College students with divorced parents during the fall semester of 2018.  In this phase of the report, this same sample of 150 students will be divided into two smaller samples. The two samples are the sample of Flagler College students who have parents that are married and Flagler College students whose parents are not married. There are 65 Flagler College students with parents who are not married and 85 Flagler College students with parents who are married.

 

Result 1: Are Your Parents Married or Divorced   [Info]
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Students surveyed answered many other questions.  They reported how many years their parents been married or were married, whether they thought that it was difficult for children of divorced parents to go back and forth between living with each parent, and if they thought that children of divorced parents are more likely to divorce themselves later in life. In this report, three comparisons will be investigated. First, a comparison will be made between the reported amount of Flagler College students whose parents have been married or not. Then, the responses to whether students thought that children of divorced parents are more likely to divorce themselves later in life, how long their parents have been married, and whether students think that it is difficult for children of divorced parents to go back and forth between living with each parent will be compared to whether the students parents are married or not.



Comparison 1: Number of Years Married and Whether the Student’s Parents were Married or Not

The following stacked box plot and corresponding summary statistics represents students who have parents who are married or not and the number of years their parents have been married.

 

There was quite a difference between the number of years the student’s parents have been married and whether the student’s parents were married or not. There were several outliers between the number of students whose parents are married and the number of years their parents were married. We can see that for students with parents who are not married or are no longer married, the number of years is much lower and there is less variability. The median for those with parents that are not married is 10, while the median for those with married parents is 25. This demonstrates that again there is a quite a difference between the two groups and the number of years their parents have been married. Q1 and Q3 for students with married parents was 2 and 20 while those with unmarried or divorced parents was 21 and 27, which again, is significantly different. Furthermore, the IQR shows a substantial difference as students with unmarried parents had an IQR of 18 while the group with married parents had an IQR of 6. It is not a surprise to conclude that the IQR is much larger for the group of students with parents who are not married, compared with the number of years that the student’s parents have been married.

 

Result 2: Number of Years Married   [Info]
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Result 3: Summary statistics for Number of Years Parents have been Married:   [Info]
Summary statistics for Number of Years Parents have been Married:
Group by: Married or Not
Married or NotnMinQ1MedianQ3MaxIQR
No650210203618
Yes850212527506

 

Comparison 2: Whether Students Are More Likely to Divorce if Their Parents Are Married or Divorced and Whether the Students Parents Were Married or Not

The following split bar graph shows the likelihood of students to divorce if their parents are already divorced. 31% of students whose parents are not married do not think they are more likely to divorce later in life. Whereas 12% of students whose parents are not married think they are likely to get divorced in the future. About 32% of students whose parents are married believe that they are not more likely to divorce later in life. Whereas 24% of students whose parents are married believe they are more likely to divorce later in life. This statistic is interesting because more students whose parents are still married believe they are more likely to get divorced later in life than those whose parents are not married.

 

Result 4: More Likely to Divorce if Parents are Currently Married vs. Divorced   [Info]
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Comparison 3: Contingency Table- Parents Married VS Is Ongoing Contact Important

The contingency table shows if people whose parents are married or not believe that ongoing contact between divorced couples is important or not. The majority (74%) of people who were surveyed parents were married and the majority of the group (84%) believed that ongoing contact between divorced parents was important. This comparison is interesting to study because the more people whose parents are married tend to think people who are not married should still stay in contact even though they have never been in that situation.

 

Result 5: Contingency table - Is Ongoing Contact Important   [Info]
Contingency table results:
Rows: Married or Not
Columns: Is Ongoing Contact Important
NoYesTotal
No174865
Yes77885
Total24126150

Chi-Square test:
StatisticDFValueP-value
Chi-square18.79928890.003

 

Conclusion:

In this comparison of the opinions between the students surveyed whose parents were married versus those whose were not, it was found that these two groups did not differ in the ways they viewed marriage. It was found if the students’ parents were divorced they were more likely not to get a divorce. It was also found that if the students’ parents were still married they had been married for a much longer time than those that split up. Those with parents married or not married both found that it is important to keep ongoing contact for split couples. These results are not surprising because if someone has to live through divorced parents I would think they would want to not have to put themselves and their children through that pain and make sure they find the right person before marrying.


Data set 1. Flagler College Students and Divorce - Lampp, Palm   [Info]
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