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Created: Oct 26, 2018
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PHASE TWO RECYCLING
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Introduction:

During the first phase of this project, data from the recycling habits of a sample of 150 Flagler College students from the fall semester of 2018 was reported. In this phase of the report, the same sample of 150 students will be divided into two smaller sub-samples. These two sub-samples are the sample of Flagler College students who use reusable bags and the sample of Flagler College students who use disposable bags. For the purpose of this report, the two samples will be defined with a simple phrase. The term “Reusable Students” will define the sample of those Flagler College students who regularly use reusable bags, and the term “Disposable Students” will refer to the sample of those Flagler College students who do not regularly use reusable bags. Students who responded “no” on the original survey are disposable bag users, and students who responded “yes” are reusable bag users. There are 65 Reusable Students and 85 Disposable Students sampled.

Result 1: Pie Chart With Data Reusable Bag Users vs. Disposable Bag Users   [Info]
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There were multiple questions that the students surveyed had to answer. Questions being investigated include the average number of times recycled monthly, opinions on the straw ban, and how often reusable bags are used. In this phase of the report, three comparisons of data will be made. First, there will be a comparison made between the number of times students have chosen not to recycle monthly and the amount of reusable and disposable bags used. The second comparison will be between the use of reusable bags and the support of the plastic straw ban. The final comparison will be between if students believe it is difficult to recycle on campus and if government funds should be used for the recycling cause.

 

Comparison One:

The stacked box and whisker plots and their corresponding summary stats represent the relationship between the number of times students have passed up recycling opportunities and whether they are Reusable students or Disposable students. There were no impossible responses given in the data set, and therefore every response was included in the data.

In general, the differences between the Reusable students and the Disposable students are not large; however, there is still significance in this data. The median for the Reusable students is 8, while the median for the Disposable group is 10. This means that the middle number of times Reusable students choose not to recycle is 8 times, while the middle number of times Disposable students choose not to recycle is 10. On average, Reusable students choose to recycle two times more than the Disposable students do. This suggests that students who use reusable bags may recycle more often than students who use disposable bags. The upper quartiles are the same for both groups, but they have slightly different lower quartiles. The lower quartile for the Reusable students is 4, while the the lower quartile for Disposable students is 5. The upper quartile for both groups of students is 15. These differences are not significantly different, which means that there is generally the same amount of variance in recycling habits for both groups. Neither sample distribution has outliers. The upper fence of 25 and the lower fence of 0 missed recycling opportunities is equal for both groups. This means that both groups have people who always recycle and people who rarely ever recycle. In addition, the variability of the Reusable and Disposable students is only slightly different. The Reusable student group have an IQR of 11, while the Disposable student group have an IQR of 10. Therefore, it seems that no matter how much effort students put into using their reusable bags, the difference in the amount of times the two groups recycle is very low.

Result 2: Number of Times Recycled Monthly Between Reusable Bag Users and Disposable Bag Users   [Info]
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Result 3: Summary Stats Comparison 1   [Info]
Summary statistics for Sample(Number of times Not Recycle):
Group by: Sample(Reusable Bags)
Sample(Reusable Bags)MinQ1MedianQ3IQR
No05101510
Yes0481511

Comparison Two:

The following split bar plot shows that the 85 disposable bag users and 65 reusable bag users differ greatly when it comes to their answers about the plastic straw ban. When looking at reusable bag users, only 12% disagree with the plastic straw ban, while 31.3% agree. On the other hand, disposable bag users are closer in percentages. When looking at disposable bag users, 30.7% do not agree with the plastic straw ban, while 26% do agree. Looking at the data, there is not a very large correlation between the two groups; however, there is correlation within each individual group. For reusable bag users, the majority agree with the plastic straw ban, thus most reusable bag users seem to be concerned about their environmental impact. On the other hand, disposable bag users were fairly equal in opinions. The majority do not agree with the plastic straw ban, but only by approximately 5%. Thus, those who are disposable bag users seem to care less about their environmental impact, but only by a few percentages. Since there are more students who use disposable bags compared to reusable bags, it is not surprising to see less variation in disposable bag users due to the law of large numbers. Overall, the 150 students surveyed tend to care more about their environmental impact if they use reusable bags compared to those who use disposable bags.

Result 4: Bar Plot With Data Comparison 2   [Info]
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Comparison Three:

The following contingency table compares the responses between the people who believe it is difficult to recycle on campus and the people who believe that government spending should support the quality of recycling. Overall, 105 of the 150 students surveyed believe that government money should improve the quality of recycling, while only 45 believe that government spending should not go towards improving the quality of recycling. Thus, 70% (105/150) of all of the students surveyed feel the government should contribute more money to improve the quality of recycling. Therefore the majority of students feel the government should have more money dedicated to the quality of recycling. Of the 89 students who believe that recycling on campus is hard, 67 believe that government spending should be put toward a better quality of recycling. Of the 61 who believe that recycling on campus is easy, 38 believe that government spending should be put toward a better quality of recycling. That is, 75.3% (67/89) of the students who believe that it is hard to recycle on campus, believe that government spending should contribute to a better quality of recycling, while 62.3% (38/61) students believe that it is easy to recycle on campus and that government spending should contribute to a better quality of recycling. Thus, 13% more students believe that it is hard to recycle on campus. There is definitely a difference in opinion on the ability to recycle easily on campus.

Result 5: Contingency table (with data)Comparison 3   [Info]
Contingency table results:
Rows: Sample(Difficult to Recycle on Campus)
Columns: Sample(Money to Improve Recycling)
NoYesTotal
No, Hard226789
Yes, Easy233861
Total45105150

Chi-Square test:
StatisticDFValueP-value
Chi-square12.90634950.0882

Conclusion:

In this comparison between students who use reusable bags (Reusable Students) and students who use disposable bags (Disposable Students), it was found that the students did not significantly differ in the amount of times they chose not to recycle. However, when comparing opinions on the plastic straw ban between reusable and disposable students, the results suggested that students who do use reusable bags do believe that there should be more of an effort to reduce plastic waste. It was also found that the majority of students who believed that it was hard to recycle on campus also believed that government spending should contribute to the quality of recycling by 13%. Overall, the majority of Reusable students leaned slightly towards more environmental conservation policies than the Disposable students. This is not surprising because individuals who wanted a better quality of recycling would have the lack of ability to recycle on campus. When inspecting the results of the 150 students in total, it is not surprising to see that those who used reusable bags leaned more towards environmental policies.




Data set 1. Jennifer_Emmaline_Eve_FCStudents and Recycling   [Info]
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By geb-guy
Nov 4, 2018

Okay, some good observations

Always Learning