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Owner: camiperezr
Created: Oct 5, 2018
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PHASE ONE: Flagler Students Surveyed on Divorce Fall 2018
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Introduction

The following report provides a statistical analysis of the various facets of divorce given the sample of a certain amount of Flagler College students. The purpose of this particular study was to gather information in order to get a better view of divorce, at least as it affects students from Flagler College. From the data provided in this report, one may be able to draw certain conclusions regarding the nature of divorce within the flagler college community.


Statement on Data Collection:

The sample of the study was Flagler college students who are enrolled in Statistics in Fall 2018. The population of the study was all Flagler college students. Potential bias in the data could arise from a lack of representation amongst the population of the survey. The people surveyed didn’t necessarily reflect the entirety of the populus of Flagler college as they were mostly underclassmen who chose to take statistics. Additionally, although the student population at Flagler college tends to be mostly women, this study had a substantial amount more of women respondents as opposed to men. This, as well, can’t be said to represent the student population entirely and thus may introduce the bias of undercoverage.


Survey Questions:


  1. What gender do you identify with?

  2. How old are you?

  3. Are your mother and father currently married?

  4. How many years have your parents been married or were married?

  5. How many of your close friends have parents that are divorced?

  6. Which if the following best describes your living situation in high school?

  7. Do you think it is important for children of divorced parents to continue to have ongoing contact with both parents?

  8. Do you think that it is difficult for children of divorced parents to go back and forth between living with each parent?

  9. Do you think that children of divorced parents are more likely to divorce themselves later in life?

  10. Do you think that parents should remain married regardless of the state of their marital relationship for the sake of their children?




Graphs and Summary Statistics


Demographics:



1 . Gender of Students Surveyed in Fall 2018

The bar graph displayed below reveals that of the sampled Flagler students, there were more females responding to the survey than there were males. This is supported by the mode of 75.3%, belonging to the women.



Result 1: Gender of Students Surveyed Fall 2018   [Info]
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2. Age of Students Surveyed in Fall 2018

The histogram below demonstrates that of Flagler students who were included in this study, the majority were younger than 20 years old at the time in which they were surveyed. The data has a couple outliers around the ranges of 25-30 and 35-39 that certainly skew the data. The data is skewed right unimodal  and, due to this, should have its center measured using median, which in this case is 18 years and its spread by IQR, which is of 1 year, as both of these measurements are resistant to outliers.




Result 2: Age of Students Surveyed   [Info]
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Result 3: Age of Students Surveyed Fall 2018   [Info]
Summary statistics:
ColumnnMeanVarianceStd. dev.Std. err.MedianRangeMaxMinQ1Q3IQR
Age15018.7933334.27243852.06698780.168768851821371618191


3. Parents of Students that are Still Married

In the bar graph shown below, it is demonstrated that of the sampled students, 55.3% of them have parents that are still together. This means that the mode of students (55.3%) of students have parents who are still married as opposed to the remaining 44.7% whose parents are divorced.



Result 4: Married Parents of Students   [Info]
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4. Number of Years Parents have Been Married

The histogram below shows the number of years in flagler student parents have been married. This graph is unimodal and skewed right. Because of this, it would be best to use the median as a measure of center and IQR as a measure of standard deviation. There doesn’t appear to be any outliers in the data. From the data in the graph, we can see that the mode of parents of Flagler students had been married for somewhere between 20-25 years when this survey was taken.


Result 5: Number of years married   [Info]
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Result 6: Number of Years Parents of Students Surveyed Are or Were Married   [Info]
Summary statistics:
ColumnnMeanVarianceStd. dev.Std. err.MedianRangeMinMaxQ1Q3IQR
Number of Years married15017.52666796.291239.81280950.801212542038038102515


5. Number of Close Friends of Students that have Divorced Parents


The histogram below shows the number of close friends of the students that were surveyed, that have divorced parents. The distribution of this graphs is right skewed and bimodal. Because of this, the best measure for the typical center value is the median, which in this case is 4. The best measure for spread in this case is the Interquartile Range or IQR, which is 3, because of the skewed distribution as well.  The graph below shows 3 potential outliers in the ranges of 15-17, 20-23, and 25-27.


Result 7: Number of close friends histogram   [Info]
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Result 8: Number of Close Friends of Students That have Divorced Parents   [Info]
Summary statistics:
ColumnnMeanVarianceStd. dev.Std. err.MedianRangeMinMaxQ1Q3IQR
Close Friends that have Divorced Parents1504.321.2852354.61359240.37669824425025253


6. Living Arrangements Throughout High School of Students Surveyed


The Pie Chart below displays the information of living arrangements throughout High School of the students surveyed. 56% of students showed they lived in one house with both parents throughout high school, which makes this the mode. The second most voted option, shows that 29.33% of students lived in one house with one parent.



Result 9: Living Arrangements of Students Surveyed   [Info]
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7. If Students Think Ongoing Contact with Both Parents is Important


The bar chart below shows whether the students surveyed think it is important for children of divorced parents to maintain contact with both of them. As displayed by the mode, 82% of students answered “yes”, which states that they believe it is important to maintain contact with both divorced parents.




Result 10: Is ongoing contact with both parents important for kids?   [Info]
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8. If Students Think it is Difficult to Live Between Two Parents


The bar chart displayed exemplifies whether the students of Flagler College think it is difficult to go back-and-forth between two separated parents. The options were “Yes” and “No.” The mode of the graph is “Yes” with 93.3% of students giving this response. With only 6.7% of students answering “No,” there is a very strong belief in students that it is difficult to live between divorced parents.


Result 11: Is it hard for children to live between parents?   [Info]
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9. If Students think Kids of Divorced Parents are More Likely to Divorce


The pie chart shown below displays whether the students of Flagler College think that kids of divorced parents are more likely to divorce in their own marriages. The options were “Yes” and “No.” The mode of the graph is “No” with 62% of students giving this response. The remaining 38% of students answered “Yes,” so the data is moderately strong for students believing that children of divorced parents are not more likely to divorce themselves in the future.




Result 12: Are Children of divorced Parents More Likely to Divorce in the Future?   [Info]
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10. Students who Think Parents Should Remain Married for the Sake of their Kids


The bar chart shown displays whether the students of Flagler College think that parents should remain married for the sake of their children. The options were “Yes” and “No.” The mode of the graph is “No” with 90% of students giving this response. Only 10% of students answered with “Yes,” showing that there is a strong belief in students that parents should not remain married for their kids.




Result 13: Stay Married for Kids   [Info]
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Data set 1. Christopher_Rebecca_Camila_FCStudents & Divorc   [Info]
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<A href="https://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/viewreport.php?reportid=80535">PHASE ONE: Flagler Students Surveyed on Divorce Fall 2018</A>

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