StatCrunch logo (home)

Report Properties
Thumbnail:

from Flickr
Owner: aschaer553
Created: Jun 5, 2018
Share: yes
Views: 167
Tags:
 
Results in this report
 
Data sets in this report
 
Need help?
To copy selected text, right click to Copy or choose the Copy option under your browser's Edit menu. Text copied in this manner can be pasted directly into most documents with formatting maintained.
To copy selected graphs, right click on the graph to Copy. When pasting into a document, make sure to paste the graph content rather than a link to the graph. For example, to paste in MS Word choose Edit > Paste Special, and select the Device Independent Bitmap option.
You can now also Mail results and reports. The email may contain a simple link to the StatCrunch site or the complete output with data and graphics attached. In addition to being a great way to deliver output to someone else, this is also a great way to save your own hard copy. To try it out, simply click on the Mail link.
PHASE TWO: Online Versus Traditional Courses
Mail   Print   Twitter   Facebook

 

PHASE TWO: Online Versus Traditional Courses

 

Introduction:

The first phase of this project, was to determine how students at Flagler College felt about taking online courses. In this phase of the report, the same 150 student sample will be divided into two smaller samples by gender. There are 97 females and 53 males sampled.

Students surveyed answered a series of 11 questions. They reported if they had taken online courses before, their perceptions of how hard online courses are in comparison to conventional courses, comparison of time consumption between online and conventional courses, and if students would take online courses if offered during regular spring/fall semesters. In this report, three comparisons will be evaluated. First, a comparison will be made between the number of online courses taken by males and females. Second, a comparison of the student’s perception of online courses being easier by gender. Lastly, the student’s responses to the question “Do you think that students enrolled in an online college course learn less than those enrolled in traditional courses?”

 

 

Comparison #1: Number of Online Courses Taken By Gender

The following stacked boxplots and corresponding summary statistics represent the number of online courses taken by gender.

Overall, there were little differences between the numbers of online courses taken by gender. The median number of online courses taken by both males and females was 1 course. However, the upper and lower quartiles showed more variation. Both males and females had a Q1 of 0, but the males had a Q3 of 2 and the females had a Q3 of 3. The IQR for the females was 3 courses and the IQR of the males was 2 Courses, still very similar. The largest difference was the maximum number of courses taken by gender, the maximum number of online courses taken reported by the females was 24 online courses, while the maximum number of online courses reported by the males was 10. I believe that the variability in the maximum number of courses taken between genders could be due to the slight difference in sample size, the number of males surveyed being 53, and the number of females surveyed being 97. Furthermore, the majority of the reported data showed that both males and female took on average 1 online course, the large maximum being caused by the few students who could have taken multiple semesters online.

 

Result 1: Online Courses Taken By Gender Comp 1 Graph   [Info]
Right click to copy

Result 2: Comp 1 Summary Stat taken online   [Info]
Summary statistics for Online courses taken:
Group by: Gender
GendernMinQ1MedianQ3MaxIQR
Female970013243
Male530012102

 

Comparison #2: Perception That Online Courses Are Easier By Gender

 

The following split bar plot shows that both males and females did not differ in their responses to the question “Do you think students enter online courses with the perception that they will be easier than a traditional course?” 91.8% of females answer yes, that they found online courses easier and 81.1% of males also agreed that online courses were easier than traditional ones. There was a larger portion of males surveyed who found online courses to be equal or harder than traditional courses (18.9%) and a smaller percentage of females, 8.2% who also found online courses to be equally as hard or harder than traditional courses.

 

Result 3: COMP 2, Graph   [Info]
Right click to copy

Comparison #3: Do Students Learn Less Taking Online Courses

The following contingency table compares the responses to the question “Do you think that students enrolled in an online college course learn less than those enrolled in traditional courses?” Overall, 101 of the 150 students surveyed answered yes, that they found that students learn less taking online courses, while 49 did not. So, 67.3% (101/150) of all students surveyed feel that students learn less taking online courses. Thus, the general consensus is that students prefer traditional classroom settings for learning.

Between the two genders, the percentage of students who found that students learn less online is almost the same, 67% of females, and 68% of males. Respectively, 33% of females and 32% of males found they learn the same or more than in traditional classroom settings.

Result 4: COMP 3 Table   [Info]
Contingency table results:
Rows: Gender
Columns: Do students learn less taking online courses
NoYesTotal
Female326597
Male173653
Total49101150

Chi-Square test:
StatisticDFValueP-value
Chi-square10.0130233260.9091

Conclusion

In this comparison of male and female student’s perceptions of online courses, and the number of online courses that they have taken, it was found that both male and female students generally answered the same to each of the questions evaluated. The average number of online courses across genders was 1, both sharing a Q1 of zero, and having similar Q3s, the females with a Q3 of 3 and the males a Q3 of 2. It was also found that both genders found online courses to be easier than traditional courses, between 80-90% of both males and females. Similarly, both males and females found that students learn less taking online courses between 67-68% of both genders finding students learn less, complement to this, between 32-33% found they learn equally as much or more taking online courses than traditional courses. Therefore, it can be concluded that gender does not play a role in a student’s perception of online courses.

<result5> 

Data set 1. Online versus Traditional Courses - Schaer   [Info]
To analyze this data, please sign in.

HTML link:
<A href="https://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/viewreport.php?reportid=78213">PHASE TWO: Online Versus Traditional Courses </A>

Comments
Want to comment? Subscribe
Already a member? Sign in.

Always Learning