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Owner: jkwitschau
Created: Jul 21, 2016
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Jeremy Kwitschau
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Type of study:

I believe this is a retrospective study because it was a past poll.  I looked at the link to the study and it’s a list of questions so there is no attempt to influence the characteristics.  The variables of interest are age, sex and if they think college is worth it.  

Population Statement:  In this project I will study the population of adults.  

Parameter: In this project I will study individuals who think college is worth the investment who had access to StatCrunch.

Proportion:  In this study I will find out if the proportion of those who think college is worth the investment.  I believe the population that believes that college is worth the investment will be greater than 75% of the total population.     

Hypothesis: 

I believe the proportion of those who think college is worth it will be greater than 75% than those who do not.

Level of Measurement:

The level of measurement is nominal.  This is data that is non-numerical that is qualitative.  It cannot be ranked or ordered.  Instead we will split it into two groups those who think college is worth it and those who don’t.  We will then see which population is greater.

Stats:

N= 1,299 / males= 559 / females= 732 / μ age= 29.3 / s= 12.93 / = 76% think college is worth it.  This information tells me that 1,299 adults were studied with only about 13 years of variation in their age.  It also tells me over ¾ think college is worth it.

Graphs:

The Pie chart below shows three population proportions.  The majority of respondents 76% think college is worth it. The next largest proportion 16% is unsure if college is worth it and the smallest proportion at 8% does not think college is worth the investment.

Result 1: Pie Chart With Data   [Info]
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The bar graph below shows the majority of respondents think college is worth it.  It also puts the other two proportions in context showing how small they are in comparison. 

Result 2: Bar Plot With Data   [Info]
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The pie chart below shows the majority of respondents are female.

Result 3: Gender Pie Chart With Summary   [Info]
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The bar graph below shows the majority of respondents are female and puts the proportions in context of larger and smaller groups.

<result4>

Hypothesis Test:

H0: proportion worth it = 75%

Ha: Population worth it < 75%

This is a left-tailed test.

The sample statistic is the proportion of those who think college is worth it- 76%

You would use a normal distribution for this because if it were graphed it would be a normal curve.

=990/1295 which is 0.7645 z= 0.7645-0.76/√0.76(1-0.76)/1295 which is z=0.0032

z<1.645 so we can reject the null hypothesis.

More than 75% believe that college is worth it and because our z score supports this we believe the alternative hypothesis is correct.

Data set 1. Survey: Is college worth it?   [Info]
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HTML link:
<A href="https://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/viewreport.php?reportid=60203">Jeremy Kwitschau</A>

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