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Created: Mar 18, 2013
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High School to College; What's the difference?
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 High School to College; What's the difference?

Savannah Ellison, Kelsey Oakes, Katie Krupp: SK2

Introduction:

How active are you in college compared to how active you were in high school? The main goal of our study was to see if there was any correlation between high school and college levels of activity, specifically in the areas of studying, playing sports, excercising, and employment. We predicted that there would be a correlation between these two main variables. In studying, we thought that if you studied a lot in high school, you most likely study a lot in college too. If you played sports in high school we thought that might also carry over. Excerising we were not too sure about, but we wanted to see what we might discover. Working at a job, we felt like might be the opposite result, that being if you worked in high school, you might not work in college. Our group believed that simply because the work load in college is so much more intense. 

The population we targeted was the Georgia College student body.

Our variables were high school and college activity levels. Under each of those we had questions for each student about the time they spent studying, time playing sports, time spent exercising, and time spent working at a job. Every student answered each of those questions using a scale from 0 to 4. The scale was broken down as follows: 0= none 1=rarely 2=sometimes 3=often 4=all the time. After we had gathered all of the completed surveys, we evaluated the results.  The scores from each question were added up and each subject then had an overall high school activity score and an overall college activity score. 

Methods:

Our group conducted a survey (which we have attached). We divided the surverys up between the three of us, each taking 10 of them and distibuting to different people we know. We each tried to target different parts of the student population because we all know different people. Savannah's main target was students involved in Baptist Collegiate Ministries (BCM). Katie's main target was students involved in NCAA Division II sports. Lastly, Kelsey's main target was students involved in the GC Honors College and students in various dorms. While each of us had main targets, we also used other students to make sure our results showed the true representation of the GC student body. We also tried to get a range of class years and a relatively even amount of male and female respondents. Our group would have liked to get more upperclassman involved in the survey, but being freshman we had more connections with the freshmen portion of the GC student body. We tried to avoid bias in our survey, but there could possibly be some sampling bias involved. We did interview a few varsity level athletes which may have skewed the resluts slightly since their specific sport is such a huge part of their daily life.

Our survey that was used for our research is here:

SK2 Survey

Instructions: Please fill out the table as accurately as you can.

1.    Rate your activity level for each activity for your time in high school and your time in college using the provided scale below.

0=None    1=Rarely    2=Sometimes    3=Often    4=All the Time

 

In High School

In College

How much did/do you study?

 

 

How often did/do you play sports?

 

 

How often did/do you exercise?

 

 

How often did/do you work at a job?

 

 

 

Instructions: For the questions below, please circle the one that applies to you.

2.    What is your gender?:

Male                     Female

3.    Did you go to a private or public high school?

Private                  Public

4.    What class year are you?

Freshman             Sophomore           Junior                   Senior

 

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to answer this survey!

-Savannah, Katie & Kelsey

 

 

Results:

The data set and graphs of our results have been included below. 

Conclusions:

Our basic findings were that activity level from high school to college did not change by much. Our overall correlation was .3038, which is moderate positive.  From that correlation, our group concluded that we do see a correlation between high school and college activity, which is for the most part what we predicted from the start. Our group did feel, however, that it might be stronger than .3038 it ended up being. 

For the most part, with a few exceptions, a student's activity level in high school was pretty similar to their college one. Result 2 shows this. We looked at Freshmen specifically, and found that there is a moderate positive correlation of .3387. When our group looked at a predicted X-Value (High School) of 9 we saw a predited Y-Value (College) of 8.645. Both values are very similar. One explanation for Freshmen's activity level could be because it is a new place with new people and new experiences. At the same time though, the work load has not become as heavy yet so they can maintain their same study patterns. However, we also see some of the same results with the upperclassman participants as well. We know this because the overall mean for high school and college activity levels were very similar, 9.8 and 9.4. These are found in Result 1.  The slope, when just looking at freshmen, was 0.46036586 which can be found in Result 2. This value shows that the Freshmen student body activity level increased slightly when they entered college. When looking at the student body as a whole, the slope was 0.40418118, which can be found in Result 4. While this is positive just like the freshmen slope, the student body's slope was smaller. Our group concluded that the reasoning behind this was that while college allows students to have more time for various activities, as they become older and more focused on their major, their activity level will drop slightly.  Even though this happens, students in college are still more active than they were in high school.

 

Result 1: Column Statistics for SK2   [Info]
Summary statistics:
Column n Mean Variance Std. Dev. Std. Err. Median Range Min Max Q1 Q3
High School Activity Level 30 9.8 3.9586208 1.9896283 0.36325476 10 7 5 12 8 11
College Activity Level 30 9.4 7.0068965 2.6470544 0.4832838 9.5 10 5 15 7 11

Result 2: Simple Linear Regression with Freshman Predicted X Value   [Info]
Simple linear regression results for Class Year=Freshman:
Dependent Variable: College Activity Level
Independent Variable: High School Activity Level
College Activity Level = 4.5 + 0.46036586 High School Activity Level
Sample size: 17
R (correlation coefficient) = 0.3387
R-sq = 0.11471162
Estimate of error standard deviation: 2.512287

Parameter estimates:
Parameter Estimate Std. Err. Alternative DF T-Stat P-Value
Intercept 4.5 3.2433484 ≠ 0 15 1.387455 0.1856
Slope 0.46036586 0.3302145 ≠ 0 15 1.3941418 0.1836


Analysis of variance table for regression model:
Source DF SS MS F-stat P-value
Model 1 12.267396 12.267396 1.9436315 0.1836
Error 15 94.67378 6.3115854
Total 16 106.94118


Predicted values:
X value Pred. Y s.e.(Pred. y) 95% C.I. for mean 95% P.I. for new
9 8.643292 0.6456964 (7.2670236, 10.019562) (3.1144469, 14.172138)

Result 3: College Activity Level Histogram   [Info]
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Result 4: Simple Linear Regression for SK2   [Info]
Simple linear regression results:
Dependent Variable: College Activity Level
Independent Variable: High School Activity Level
College Activity Level = 5.4390244 + 0.40418118 High School Activity Level
Sample size: 30
R (correlation coefficient) = 0.3038
R-sq = 0.092293344
Estimate of error standard deviation: 2.5665846

Parameter estimates:
Parameter Estimate Std. Err. Alternative DF T-Stat P-Value
Intercept 5.4390244 2.393839 ≠ 0 28 2.2720928 0.031
Slope 0.40418118 0.23954365 ≠ 0 28 1.6872966 0.1027


Analysis of variance table for regression model:
Source DF SS MS F-stat P-value
Model 1 18.754007 18.754007 2.8469698 0.1027
Error 28 184.446 6.587357
Total 29 203.2

Result 5: High School Activity Level Histogram   [Info]
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Result 6: Scatter Plot Grouped by Class   [Info]
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Result 7: Scatter Plot for SK2   [Info]
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Result 8: Gender Pie Chart   [Info]
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Result 9: School Type Pie Chart   [Info]
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Result 10: Class Year Pie Chart   [Info]
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Data set 1. SK2 Project   [Info]
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Comments
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By ledler1225
Apr 11, 2013

Report did not include example using prediction equation.

Presentation Score 42.5/50
Report Score 48/50
Total 90.5/100
By ledler1225
Mar 19, 2013

Good introduction to motivation and context for project.
Population clearly defined.
The scale was introduced and survey questions were given, but the explanatory and response variables were not clearly named or defined in the introduction. That makes the following discussion hard to follow.
Good description of study design and steps to avoid bias.
Good description of results and correlation.
Good discussion of conclusion.
Group did not discuss slope or give the regression equation.
I will post the final grade here when ready.

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