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Data Set/Description Owner Last edited Size Views
FINAL STATS WORKING WOMAN SURVEY
Survey Title: Working Women: Work & Sleep Focus group: Working women. Purpose: To correlate the amount of sleep working women obtain, and level of refreshment) to the amount of hours worked, per week. Data collection method: Social media, in person, telephone, electronic texting, e-mail, and telephonic. Appendix: Contains raw data collected, per contributing person
lorriefrenchMar 28, 20194KB891
Responses to Social Media Survey
Respondents provided their most used social media application (Media App), how many minutes they spent on social media per day (Time spent), the number of times they visited social media per day (Visits per day), the number of posts they make per week (Posts per week), their gender (Gender), and their age (Age).
scsurveyOct 24, 2017196KB4076
Responses to Facebook Survey
A recent survey asked respondents if they have a Facebook account, the average number of times a day they look at Facebook, the average number of times a week they change their status, their age, if they are a student, and their gender.

Check out the original survey here: http://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/survey.php?surveyid=1345&code=COEYO&groupid=256

Feel free to copy it for your own use

scsurveyMar 4, 20118KB2641
Happiness Data from GSS.xls
These data come from the 2008 General Social Survey. A subset of 190 respondents were selected at random from the full data set. Children = number of children. Education is highest year of education (e.g., 12 = High School; 16 = Bachelors, etc.). Happy: 1 = Not too happy, 2 = Pretty Happy, 3 = Very Happy. Health: 1 = Poor, 2 = Fair, 3 = Good, 4 = Excellent. Income: 1 = Under $1000; 2 = $1000-2999; 3 = $3000-3999; 4 = $4000-4999; 5 = $5000-5999; 6 = $6000-6999; 7 = $7000-7999; 8 = $8000-9999; 9 = $10000-12499; 10 = $12500-14999; 11 = $15000-17499; 12 = $17500-19999; 13 = $20000-22499; 14 = $22500-24999; 15 = $25000-29999; 16 = $30000-34999; 17 = $35000-39999; 18 = $40000-49999; 19 = $50000-59999; 20 = $60000-74999; 21 = $75000-$89999; 22 = $90000-$109999; 23 = $110000-$129999; 24 = $130000-$149999; 25 = $150000+. Married: 0 = No, 1 = Yes. Religious: 1 = Not religious, 2 = Slightly religious, 3 = Moderately religious, 4 = Very religious.
jacobgsimonsApr 20, 20105KB4026
Responses to the Social Networking Survey
This data set provides the results from a social networking survey administered on the StatCrunch site between February 6th, 2009 and February 16th, 2009. Respondents were asked to provide the primary site they used for social networking and the number of times they accessed this site each week in addition to their age and gender.
websterwestFeb 16, 20095KB2138
Survey on Exercise
- Value Key 2 Yes 1 No 2 Male 1 Female 1-Aesthetics 2-Fitness 3-Fun 4-Healthy 5-Hobby 6-Medical 7-No Motivation 8-Mental Motional 9-Requirement 10-Social 11-Time 1-Cardio 2-Combination 3-None 4-Resistance 5-yoga / Pilates Source of information on exercise. 1-Doctor 2-Friend or family 3-Media 4-N/A 5-professional 6-text 7-school 8-trainer 1- 2-.5-1 years 3- <.5 years 4-1-2 years 5- 2+ years 1=0 2=1-2 3=3-4 4=5+ 1=0 2- < 30 minutes 3. 31-60 4- 61-90 5- > 90 Source of information on exercise. 1-Doctor 2-Friend or family 3-Media 4-N/A 5-professional 6-text 7-school 8-trainer
jramirez514May 18, 20133KB2391
RegisteredNursesSurvey.xlsx
For what survey produced it, see http://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/survey.php?surveyid=8178&code=YINVQ and inputs of all team mates. Towards the end, some validation was done, deleting data where working hours was less than a work day, or outliers to legally admissible work days. Finally arbitarily long chains which were less likely to be encountered in draws of simulated data (M/F, Degrees etc.. were discarded). A total of 12 observations were thus thrown out. All Credit goes to Team 3,the Instructor, our unnamed Friends in the Nursing profession who enthusiastically did a last minute push through over their extended social media groups for data and the respondents who kindly took out time for the survey. Another thought is about the distribution of hours worked. Wven if random, it "should be" "centered on" certain hours a day* number of days, with deviations from centre penalised, while picking a sample.. The observations 38 appear many times for example, however without an explainable reason (we are talking of work-distribution among nursing staff sample) So do "primes" "47, 37, 29" It is not to argue that they "shouldn't occur", but there has to be some reason for their being so significant/vibrant. At this stage we may conclude that most of the respondents may not have been under full-time nursing employments in strict sense of the term. 42, 48,72,60, 50,40 appearing more often would give us less variation but more regularity in the data. Since we haven't tried stratification, we do not know "how often they should occur". We thus do not re-draw observations.
ugoagwuJun 14, 20142KB1076
Social Media users: gender, age, media app
Respondents provided their most used social media application (Media App), how many minutes they spent on social media per day (Time spent), the number of times they visited social media per day (Visits per day), the number of posts they make per week (Posts per week), their gender (Gender), and their age (Age).
bani15696Mar 31, 2018137KB2610
gss2008-short.xls
The General Social Survey (GSS) conducts basic scientific research on the structure and development of American society with a data-collection program designed to both monitor social change within the United States and to compare the United States to other nations. The GSS data sets contain a standard ‘core’ of demographic and attitudinal questions, plus topics of special interest, representing the population of American adults, 18 years of age or older. More information about the GSS and its original data sets can be found at http://www.norc.org/GSS+Website/. This is part 1 of the original data.
bwachsmuth1Oct 9, 20121MB910
Economics and Policy.xls
Growth RGDP: RGDP is real gross domestic product. The growth in real gross domestic product is the common measure of a country's economic health. Unemployment Rate: The number of unemployed people divided by the number of people in the labor force. The labor force includes only those who have a job or who are seeking a job. Employment Rate: The number of employed people divided by the working age population. The working age population includes all people from age 15 to 64, regardless of whether or not they are in the labor force. Federal Revenue per GDP: The total amount of money the Federal government receives expressed as a fraction of the size of the economy (GDP). Federal Spending per GDP: The total amount of money the Federal government spends expressed as a fraction of the size of the economy (GDP). Federal Debt per GDP: The total Federal debt expressed as a fraction of the size of the economy (GDP). Here, Federal debt includes both public debt outstanding (money the Federal government has borrowed from people, companies, and foreign governments) and intergovernmental debt (money the Federal government has borrowed from the Social Security trust fund). Top Federal Income Tax Rate: The Federal income tax rate paid by those in the highest tax bracket. Recession: This variable is 1 if the country was in recession in the indicated year and 0 otherwise. Democratic President: This variable is 1 if the President was a Democrat, 0 if the President was a Republican. Seats in House Held by Democrats: The number of Democrats in the House of Representative as a fraction of the total number of Representatives. Due to a small number of independents, the fraction of seats held by Republicans is approximately (but not exactly) one minus the fraction of seats held by Democrats. Seats in Senate Held by Democrats: The number of Democrats in the Senate as a fraction of the total number of Senators. Due to a small number of independents, the fraction of seats held by Republicans is approximately (but not exactly) one minus the fraction of seats held by Democrats. War: This variable is 1 if the country was at war, 0 otherwise.
adaviesNov 2, 20108KB1481
Body Image Data Set
A student survey was conducted at a major university. Data were collected from a random sample of 239 undergraduate students, and the information that was collected included physical characteristics (such as height, handedness, etc.), study habits, academic performance and attitudes, and social behaviors. In this exercise, we will focus on exploring relationships between some of those variables. Note that empty boxes signify that this observation is not available (this is known as a 'missing value').Variables: Variables Gender - Male or Female Height - Self-reported height (in inches) GPA - Student's cumulative college GPA HS_GPA - Student's high school GPA (senior year) Seat - Typical classroom seat location (F = Front, M = Middle, B = Back) WtFeel - Does the student feel that he/she is: Underweight, About Right, Overweight Cheat - Would the tell the instructor if he/she saw somebody cheating on exam? (No or Yes)
stjohn314Apr 8, 201810KB3195
Body Image Data Set
A student survey was conducted at a major university. Data were collected from a random sample of 239 undergraduate students, and the information that was collected included physical characteristics (such as height, handedness, etc.), study habits, academic performance and attitudes, and social behaviors. In this exercise, we will focus on exploring relationships between some of those variables. Note that empty boxes signify that this observation is not available (this is known as a 'missing value').Variables: Variables Gender - Male or Female Height - Self-reported height (in inches) GPA - Student's cumulative college GPA HS_GPA - Student's high school GPA (senior year) Seat - Typical classroom seat location (F = Front, M = Middle, B = Back) WtFeel - Does the student feel that he/she is: Underweight, About Right, Overweight Cheat - Would the tell the instructor if he/she saw somebody cheating on exam? (No or Yes)
33225049_ecollege_sacmlpJul 1, 20157KB7698
MTH 157 Project
Previous studies have shown that urban bus drivers have an extremely stressful job, and a large proportion of drivers retire prematurely with disabilities due to occupational stress. These stresses come from a combination of physical and social sources such as traffic congestion, incessant time pressure, and unruly passengers. In the paper, “Hassles on the Job: A Study of a Job Intervention with Urban Bus Drivers” (Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 20, pp. 199 – 208), G. Evans et al. examined the effects of an intervention program to improve the conditions of urban bus drivers. Among other variables, the researchers monitored diastolic blood pressure of bus drivers in downtown Stockholm, Sweden. The data, in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), are based on the blood pressures obtained prior to intervention for the 41 bus drivers in the study.
apr2575Dec 15, 2014150B780
gss2008-short-2.xls
The General Social Survey (GSS) conducts basic scientific research on the structure and development of American society with a data-collection program designed to both monitor social change within the United States and to compare the United States to other nations. The GSS data sets contain a standard ‘core’ of demographic and attitudinal questions, plus topics of special interest, representing the population of American adults, 18 years of age or older. More information about the GSS and its original data sets can be found at http://www.norc.org/GSS+Website/. This is part 2 of the original data.
bwachsmuth1Oct 9, 2012935KB641
Movies IMDB ranked.xlsx
Statistics for the Social Sciences, Correlation database
nicholspsychologyOct 14, 201713KB619

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