StatCrunch logo (home)

Data sets shared by StatCrunch members
Showing 1 to 15 of 403 data sets matching STUDY
Data Set/Description Owner Last edited Size Views
Running Speed
a study of how gender, age, and weight affect running speed
ans050Dec 3, 2018551B368
McKenna Morrissey: Depression and the Internet
This study was done to figure if spending more time on the internet causes depression. This data set includes hours spent on the internet per week, depression before, and after, gender, race, age, household income, and household size. (https://dasl.datadescription.com/datafile/depression-and-the-internet/?_sfm_cases=4+17504&sf_paged=6)
mckenrmOct 24, 20189KB841
Diamond Ring Prices.xls
The source of the data is a full page advertisement placed in the Straits Times newspaper issue of February 29, 1992, by a Singapore-based retailer of diamond jewelry. The advertisement contained pictures of diamond rings and listed their prices, diamond content, and gold purity. Only 20K ladies' rings, each mounted with a single diamond stone, were considered for this study. 20K rings are made with gold of 20 carat purity. (Pure gold is rated as 24K.) There were 48 such rings of varying designs. The weights of the diamond stones ranged from 0.12 to 0.35 carats (a one carat diamond stone weighs 0.2 gram) and were priced between $223 and $1086. The jewelry store adopted a fixed-price policy. How Is Jewelry Priced? In Singapore, the pricing of gold jewelry is simple. The price equals the current market value of the gold content (i.e., weight times the going rate per gram of gold) plus a craftsmanship fee. However, the pricing of other jewelry like diamond rings is more complicated because they are not as standardized as gold jewelry. The price of diamond jewelry depends on the four C's: caratage, cut, colour, and clarity of the diamond stone. A good cut gives a diamond more sparkle. Colourless diamonds are the most prized. A flawless diamond has maximum clarity because the passage of light is unimpeded through the stone. Cut, colour, and clarity are subjective factors and are very hard for the layman to gauge.
craig_slinkmanApr 22, 2010586B2445
Body Image Data Set
A student survey was conducted at a major university. Data were collected from a random sample of 239 undergraduate students, and the information that was collected included physical characteristics (such as height, handedness, etc.), study habits, academic performance and attitudes, and social behaviors. In this exercise, we will focus on exploring relationships between some of those variables. Note that empty boxes signify that this observation is not available (this is known as a 'missing value').Variables: Variables Gender - Male or Female Height - Self-reported height (in inches) GPA - Student's cumulative college GPA HS_GPA - Student's high school GPA (senior year) Seat - Typical classroom seat location (F = Front, M = Middle, B = Back) WtFeel - Does the student feel that he/she is: Underweight, About Right, Overweight Cheat - Would the tell the instructor if he/she saw somebody cheating on exam? (No or Yes)
stjohn314Apr 8, 201810KB2311
Hurricane Names Archival Study
In a study, the names of 94 hurricanes were provided to nine independent coders. The coders were not informed that these were hurricane names. The coders were asked to evaluate the perceived masculinity or femininity of the names on two items (1 = very masculine, 11 = very feminine, 1 = very man-like, 11 = very woman-like). These items were averaged for each coder and then averaged across all coders to get the MasFem rating for each hurricane name. Other variables for each hurricane included in the data set are minimum pressure (using two different metrics), the true gender of the hurricane name, category, death toll, normalized damage estimates (NDAM in millions of 2013 dollars) and the elapsed years since the hurricane occurred and the study was conducted.
websterwestJun 3, 20144KB1014
Treatment Effects of a Drug on Cognitive Functioning in Children with Mental Retardation and ADHD
Research conducted by: Pearson et al. Case study prepared by: David Lane and Emily Zitek Overview This study investigated the cognitive effects of stimulant medication in children with mental retardation and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. This case study shows the data for the Delay of Gratification (DOG) task. Children were given various dosages of a drug, methylphenidate (MPH) and then completed this task as part of a larger battery of tests. The order of doses was counterbalanced so that each dose appeared equally often in each position. For example, six children received the lowest dose first, six received it second, etc. The children were on each dose one week before testing. This task, adapted from the preschool delay task of the Gordon Diagnostic System (Gordon, 1983), measures the ability to suppress or delay impulsive behavioral responses. Children were told that a star would appear on the computer screen if they waited long enough to press a response key. If a child responded sooner in less than four seconds after their previous response, they did not earn a star, and the 4-second counter restarted. The DOG differentiates children with and without ADHD of normal intelligence (e.g., Mayes et al., 2001), and is sensitive to MPH treatment in these children (Hall & Kataria, 1992). Questions to Answer Does higher dosage lead to higher cognitive performance (measured by the number of correct responses to the DOG task)? Design Issues This is a repeated-measures design because each participant performed the task after each dosage. Variable Description Placebo: Number of correct responses after taking a placebo d15 Number of correct responses after taking .15 mg/kg of the drug d30 Number of correct responses after taking .30 mg/kg of the drug d60 Number of correct responses after taking .60 mg/kg of the drug
kari.taylorOct 22, 2014434B1387
Telephone Holding Times
An airline has a toll-free phone number that they use for reservations. Sometimes callers have to be placed on hold. The airline conducted a randomized experiment to determine if there was a significant difference in how long a caller would remain on hold depending on what is playing on the call. The airline randomly selected one out of every 1000 calls to be placed on hold with either a advertisement of current promotions, with muzak playing (elevator music), or with classical music playing. Total, 15 callers were sampled for this study. Each column is the number of minutes that the random caller remained on the line until they hung up for each type of recorded message. This data set comes from "Statistics: The Art and Science of Learning from Data" by Alan Agresti and Christine Franklin.
statcrunchhelpSep 17, 201485B1486
NFL Team Statistics
http://www.nfl.com/stats/categorystats?archive=true&conference=null&role=TM&offensiveStatisticCategory=GAME_STATS&defensiveStatisticCategory=null&season=2011&seasonType=REG&tabSeq=2&qualified=false&Submit=Go http://regressing.deadspin.com/why-those-statistics-about-the-patriots-fumbles-are-mos-1681805710 http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2015/01/27/study-questions-what-behind-patriots-low-fumble-rate/ayCrAx6WYoU9NjWLALiQ0H/story.html
burnsbethFeb 27, 201531KB1330
Granola comparison
Ten subjects in this fictional study were each asked to sample three kinds of granola cereal, labelled simply "A", "B", and "C", and to rate the granola's taste on a scale of 1 to 10. Each subject was given the three granola samples in random order.
statcrunchhelpApr 19, 2016223B902
Body Image Data Set
A student survey was conducted at a major university. Data were collected from a random sample of 239 undergraduate students, and the information that was collected included physical characteristics (such as height, handedness, etc.), study habits, academic performance and attitudes, and social behaviors. In this exercise, we will focus on exploring relationships between some of those variables. Note that empty boxes signify that this observation is not available (this is known as a 'missing value').Variables: Variables Gender - Male or Female Height - Self-reported height (in inches) GPA - Student's cumulative college GPA HS_GPA - Student's high school GPA (senior year) Seat - Typical classroom seat location (F = Front, M = Middle, B = Back) WtFeel - Does the student feel that he/she is: Underweight, About Right, Overweight Cheat - Would the tell the instructor if he/she saw somebody cheating on exam? (No or Yes)
33225049_ecollege_sacmlpJul 1, 20157KB7304
Low Birth Weight Study
SOURCE: Hosmer and Lemeshow (2000) Applied Logistic Regression: Second Edition Data were collected at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts during 1986. DESCRIPTIVE ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to identify risk factors associated with giving birth to a low birth weight baby (weighing less than 2500 grams). Data were collected on 189 women, 59 of which had low birth weight babies and 130 of which had normal birth weight babies. Four variables which were thought to be of importance were age, weight of the subject at her last menstrual period, race, and the number of physician visits during the first trimester of pregnancy. LIST OF VARIABLES: Columns Variable Abbreviation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2-4 Identification Code ID 10 Low Birth Weight (0 = Birth Weight >= 2500g, LOW 1 = Birth Weight < 2500g) 17-18 Age of the Mother in Years AGE 23-25 Weight in Pounds at the Last Menstrual Period LWT 32 Race (1 = White, 2 = Black, 3 = Other) RACE 40 Smoking Status During Pregnancy (1 = Yes, 0 = No) SMOKE 48 History of Premature Labor (0 = None 1 = One, etc.) PTL 55 History of Hypertension (1 = Yes, 0 = No) HT 61 Presence of Uterine Irritability (1 = Yes, 0 = No) UI 67 Number of Physician Visits During the First Trimester FTV (0 = None, 1 = One, 2 = Two, etc.) 73-76 Birth Weight in Grams BWT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- PEDAGOGICAL NOTES: These data have been used as an example of fitting a multiple logistic regression model. STORY BEHIND THE DATA: Low birth weight is an outcome that has been of concern to physicians for years. This is due to the fact that infant mortality rates and birth defect rates are very high for low birth weight babies. A woman's behavior during pregnancy (including diet, smoking habits, and receiving prenatal care) can greatly alter the chances of carrying the baby to term and, consequently, of delivering a baby of normal birth weight. The variables identified in the code sheet given in the table have been shown to be associated with low birth weight in the obstetrical literature. The goal of the current study was to ascertain if these variables were important in the population being served by the medical center where the data were collected. References: 1. Hosmer and Lemeshow, Applied Logistic Regression, Wiley, (1989).
wikipetersonJul 23, 20126KB7199
Sleep Deprivation Study
Does sleep deprivation have harmful effects on cognitive functioning three days later? Stickgold, James, and Hobson (Nature Neuroscience, 2000) investigated this question by providing training to 21 volunteer subjects followed up by an initial test. The subjects were then divided into two groups: one group was deprived of sleep following the test, and the other group was permitted unrestricted sleep after the test. Both groups were then allowed as much sleep as they wanted on the following two nights. All subjects were then re-tested on the third day. This data set contains the improvement as measured by the difference between the two exam scores (second - first) and the sleep conditions imposed on the subject. Note that a negative value indicates a decrease in performance.
websterwestApr 10, 2014368B3014
Body Fat
Body Fat Measurements for 30 participants in a physical fitness study.
cecil_collegeJul 5, 2011318B2288
Breast Cancer
Datafile Name: Breast Cancer Datafile Subjects: Health , Medical Story Names: Breast cancer Reference: A.J. Lea. (1965). New Observations on Distribution of Neoplasms of Female Breast in Certain Countries. British Medical Journal, 1, 488-490. Text Citation: Velleman, P. F. and Hoaglin, D. C. (1981). Applications, Basics, and Computing of Exploratory Data Analysis. Belmont. CA: Wadsworth, Inc., pp. 127-134. Authorization: free use Description: Data contains the mean annual temperature (in degrees F) and Mortality Index for neoplasms of the female breast. Data were taken from certain regions of Great Britain, Norway, and Sweden. Number of cases: 16 Variable Names: Mortality: Mortality index for neoplasms of the female breast Temperature: Mean annual temperature (in degrees F) In the early 1960s, data were collected from official statistics registers of Great Britain, Norway and Sweden on breast cancer mortality. Death rates for neoplasms of the breast were calculated for various age groups and for certain areas at the same latitude. Age-specific death rates were then calculated for each area and converted to a mortality index using 100 as the age-specific rate for all of England and Wales. The mean annual temperatures at various latitudes under study were obtained from the British Meteorological Office.
phil_larsonDec 2, 2015187B2136
Jealousy file.xlsx
Do men and women differ in jealousy about their romantic partners? Research by Buss, Larsen, Westen, and Semmelroth (Exp. 1, 1992) suggested that the answer is yes. In that study, heterosexual men and women in the United States imagined their romantic partners engaged in emotional or sexual affairs with another person, and then indicated which scenario would be more upsetting to them. Men reported being more distressed when imagining their partners involved in sexual infidelity, whereas women were more distressed when they imagined their partners involved in emotional infidelity. Buss et al. concluded that their findings supported their hypotheses, which were derived from evolutionary theory. Subsequent research either supported the Buss et al. (1992) findings or found limitations to their conclusions (Harris, 2003). For example, although Buss et al. used a forced-choice method in their study (e.g., “Which of these two scenarios is more upsetting?”), others have not found such clear sex differences when rating scales are used instead (DeSteno, Bartlett, Braverman, & Salvoes, 2002). In addition, cultural differences have also been found. For example, European and Asian men are more likely to choose emotional infidelity as worse, compared to American men (Harris, 2004). The purpose of this study was to see if (a) we would replicate the original Buss et al. (1992) findings using an Australian sample in 2015, and (b) whether asking participants to rate their feelings would reveal the same sex differences that were reported in the original work. We therefore had separate hypotheses regarding the differences between men and women with respect to emotional infidelity and sexual infidelity.
e.vanmanMay 7, 20177KB980

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10   >

Always Learning