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Showing 31 to 45 of 289 data sets matching SPRING
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Low Birth Weight Study
SOURCE: Hosmer and Lemeshow (2000) Applied Logistic Regression: Second Edition Data were collected at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts during 1986. DESCRIPTIVE ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to identify risk factors associated with giving birth to a low birth weight baby (weighing less than 2500 grams). Data were collected on 189 women, 59 of which had low birth weight babies and 130 of which had normal birth weight babies. Four variables which were thought to be of importance were age, weight of the subject at her last menstrual period, race, and the number of physician visits during the first trimester of pregnancy. LIST OF VARIABLES: Columns Variable Abbreviation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2-4 Identification Code ID 10 Low Birth Weight (0 = Birth Weight >= 2500g, LOW 1 = Birth Weight < 2500g) 17-18 Age of the Mother in Years AGE 23-25 Weight in Pounds at the Last Menstrual Period LWT 32 Race (1 = White, 2 = Black, 3 = Other) RACE 40 Smoking Status During Pregnancy (1 = Yes, 0 = No) SMOKE 48 History of Premature Labor (0 = None 1 = One, etc.) PTL 55 History of Hypertension (1 = Yes, 0 = No) HT 61 Presence of Uterine Irritability (1 = Yes, 0 = No) UI 67 Number of Physician Visits During the First Trimester FTV (0 = None, 1 = One, 2 = Two, etc.) 73-76 Birth Weight in Grams BWT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- PEDAGOGICAL NOTES: These data have been used as an example of fitting a multiple logistic regression model. STORY BEHIND THE DATA: Low birth weight is an outcome that has been of concern to physicians for years. This is due to the fact that infant mortality rates and birth defect rates are very high for low birth weight babies. A woman's behavior during pregnancy (including diet, smoking habits, and receiving prenatal care) can greatly alter the chances of carrying the baby to term and, consequently, of delivering a baby of normal birth weight. The variables identified in the code sheet given in the table have been shown to be associated with low birth weight in the obstetrical literature. The goal of the current study was to ascertain if these variables were important in the population being served by the medical center where the data were collected. References: 1. Hosmer and Lemeshow, Applied Logistic Regression, Wiley, (1989).
shlee@viterbo.eduApr 11, 20166KB372
Spring 2017 SKittles
The collection of class data for GOF test
daniel.lemay@ccv.eduApr 24, 201743B2
HairCut Data
Spring 2006 Section 3-4 Haircuts by Gender
ds-10519%scAug 11, 2008303B248
GPA Comparison. Fall11 and Spring 12. MBA students
Comparing GPA's of MBA students received in their 1st semester (Fall 11) and 2nd semester (Spring 12).
oksanacarlsonOct 6, 2012887B112
SpringStatsOld.xls
The data set is of student online tests taken during the term, not proctored. The last column is the average of the 4 tests. Next to last column is of the proctored final exam scores.
drgwenApr 2, 20112KB186
Lab 1 Spring 2013petkewic@stat.sc.eduJan 22, 201314KB666
LCCC-Glove Use Among Nurses
I found this interestin because I have worked with nurses for many years and have seen my fair share of nurses who do not wear gloves when they should. Most wear them but there are always a few who are in a hurry and just do what they need to do without using personal protective gear.
brianaluceroJan 13, 2012863B55
STAT 110 class data
Data collected from a STAT 110 course at the University of South Carolina in the Spring of 2002.
ColumnDescription
SEX sex of the student
HAND right-handed or left-handed student
EYES student eye color (BL = BLUE, GR = GREEN, BR = BROWN, OT = OTHER)
GRADE grade on Exam1
STUDY time student studied for exam 1 (in minutes)
sampleuserMay 25, 2007684B152
Homework01-data
"Driving ability after pupillary dilatation" by Goel, Maharajan, Dong, Burcher, and Bagga Eye,2003, vol 17, pages 735-738 Data for MCS-242 Applied Statistical Methods, Spring 2010 Homework 01
cdobler@scFeb 18, 2010723B142
Module 9 Problem Session Data Spring 2017math.ralphApr 18, 201793KB386
MAT152 Spring 2017 All12977756_ecollege_rcccmlpJan 15, 201710KB558
Low Birth Weight Study
SOURCE: Hosmer and Lemeshow (2000) Applied Logistic Regression: Second Edition Data were collected at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts during 1986. DESCRIPTIVE ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to identify risk factors associated with giving birth to a low birth weight baby (weighing less than 2500 grams). Data were collected on 189 women, 59 of which had low birth weight babies and 130 of which had normal birth weight babies. Four variables which were thought to be of importance were age, weight of the subject at her last menstrual period, race, and the number of physician visits during the first trimester of pregnancy. LIST OF VARIABLES: Columns Variable Abbreviation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2-4 Identification Code ID 10 Low Birth Weight (0 = Birth Weight >= 2500g, LOW 1 = Birth Weight < 2500g) 17-18 Age of the Mother in Years AGE 23-25 Weight in Pounds at the Last Menstrual Period LWT 32 Race (1 = White, 2 = Black, 3 = Other) RACE 40 Smoking Status During Pregnancy (1 = Yes, 0 = No) SMOKE 48 History of Premature Labor (0 = None 1 = One, etc.) PTL 55 History of Hypertension (1 = Yes, 0 = No) HT 61 Presence of Uterine Irritability (1 = Yes, 0 = No) UI 67 Number of Physician Visits During the First Trimester FTV (0 = None, 1 = One, 2 = Two, etc.) 73-76 Birth Weight in Grams BWT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- References: 1. Hosmer and Lemeshow, Applied Logistic Regression, Wiley, (1989).
cetrohaNov 14, 20166KB113
Spring 2015 ONLINE Surveyirene.palaciosSep 3, 201517KB628
AgesofWomenNamedHelen
a collection of 1034 women in US named Helen (representative of population from Wolfram Alpha) This "population" of 1034 was constructed to be proportionally representative of the estimated 433,205 females named Helen alive in the US today, based on the estimated age distribution generated in WolframAlpha. wolframalpha.com (data gathered Spring 2014 by Hollylynne Lee)
hollylynne@ncsu.eduApr 4, 20164KB16
STAT 110 class data
Data collected from a STAT 110 course at the University of South Carolina in the Spring of 2002.
ColumnDescription
SEX sex of the student
HAND right-handed or left-handed student
EYES student eye color (BL = BLUE, GR = GREEN, BR = BROWN, OT = OTHER)
GRADE grade on Exam1
STUDY time student studied for exam 1 (in minutes)
mystatcourseAug 10, 20082KB96

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