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Flagler College Students & Divorce
Generated Mar 26, 2019 by anewton877

PHASE TWO

 

Introduction:

 

During the first phase of this project, we looked at all the data collected from 150 Flagler College Students from the Spring Semester of 2019.  Now we are going to take a look at the second phase of this project which will be the total Flagler college students in two smaller categories. These groups are “Students Whose Parents Are Divorced” and “Students More Likely to Get Divorced”. Looking at this data we define which two samples must be used, we must think about cause and effect.  The outcomes of the first survey should be resulted because of the evidence in the second sets of data.  

 

Result One: Flagler College Students with Divorced Parents

 

 

 

 

The graph above shows the findings for Flagler College students that have parents who are divorced and parents who aren’t. First, A comparison will be made between these students and the marital status of their parents and students that are living between parents. Then, we will compare the data between students more likely to stay together for kids and more likely to get divorced; which plays directly into students and if their parents are divorced.

 

 

 

Comparison #1: Students Living Between Parents 

 

 

 

In conclusion, we found there to be a major confusion between the two data sets.  Students recorded on their parent’s marital status tends to be a 50/50 division, but when you look at the students who are living between parents, we find that also 93.33% of students were living between parents. In our social norms that data seems untrue therefore to us, this data comparison seems unusual.  Looking at students who are not living between parents are only at 6.67% of the 150 Flagler College Students. 

 

 

Result 2: More Likely to Get Divorced

 

Below we take a look at a bar graph that showcases the data collected about students and if they are more likely to get divorced. With this data, we compared students who would stay married for their kids.  We again get doubled the number of students who said no (94 students) than those who said yes (56 students). 

 

 

 

Comparison 2: Stay Married for Kids

 

Of the 150 Flagler College students, 84.67% of students would not stay married for the kids and 15.33% of the students say they would stay married for the kids. This is showing preservation for the self rather than the family and those who have chosen “yes”, see marriage as a bond that children must have. 

 

Contingency table results:


Rows: More Likely to Divorce
Columns: Stay Married for Kids

 

No

Yes

Total

No

83

11

94

Yes

44

12

56

Total

127

23

150

 

Chi-Square test:

 

Statistic

DF

Value

P-value

Chi-square

1

2.5573122

0.1098

 

 

Contingency table results:

 

This shows a majority of the Flagler College students live with both parents. Following is the students who lived in one house with one parent; indicating that they are single parents. In third, are students who lived in two houses with one parent in each, and finally, the category “other” which may indicate those who live with relatives, friends or alone.


Rows: Living Arrangements
Columns: Married

 

No

Yes

Total

Lived in one house with both parents

48

49

97

Lived in one house with one parent.

8

20

28

Lived in two houses, one with each parent.

8

9

17

Other

3

5

8

Total

67

83

150

 

Chi-Square test:

 

Statistic

DF

Value

P-value

Chi-square

3

4.0514194

0.256

 

 

 

Conclusion:

In this comparison of the students surveyed we found that the data, when compared found that students with married parents still lived between two houses, indicating possible second marriages.  In this study, based on the students with non-married parents (44.67% of Students) and the students with married parents (55.33% of students), we see that almost all of the students, 93.33% of students have biological parents who are no longer together. Similarly, we found that in the two groups, non-married parents and married parents, students did differ in opinions of how their parent’s marriage affects their relationships/family in the future.

 

Contingency table results:


Rows: More Likely to Divorce
Columns: Stay Married for Kids

 

No

Yes

Total

No

83

11

94

Yes

44

12

56

Total

127

23

150

 

Chi-Square test:

 

Statistic

DF

Value

P-value

Chi-square

1

2.5573122

0.1098

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contingency table results:

 

This shows a majority of the Flagler College students live with both parents. Following, is the students who lived in one house with one parent; indicating that they are single parents. In third, are students who lived in two houses with one parent in each, and finally, the category “other” which may indicate those who live with relatives, friends or alone.


Rows: Living Arrangements
Columns: Married

 

No

Yes

Total

Lived in one house with both parents

48

49

97

Lived in one house with one parent.

8

20

28

Lived in two houses, one with each parent.

8

9

17

Other

3

5

8

Total

67

83

150

 

Chi-Square test:

 

Statistic

DF

Value

P-value

Chi-square

3

4.0514194

0.256

 

 

 

Conclusion:

In this comparison of the students surveyed we found that the data, when compared found that students with married parents still lived between two houses, indicating possible second marriages.  In this study, based on the students with non-married parents (44.67% of Students) and the students with married parents (55.33% of students), we see that almost all of the students, 93.33% of students have biological parents who are no longer together. Similarly, we found that in the two groups, non-married parents and married parents, students did differ in opinions of how their parent’s marriage effects their relationships/family in the future.

 

 

Result 1: Parents Still Married   [Info]
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Result 2: between parents   [Info]
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Result 3: divorced   [Info]
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Result 4: stay for kids   [Info]
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