Print - Back

Climate Change Phase Two - Grace Kiser, Trinity Purcell, Landon Rother
Generated Mar 14, 2019 by gkiser129

Climate Change Phase Two - Grace Kiser, Trinity Purcell, Landon Rother


Introduction:

On the first phase of this project, the views on climate change of 150 Flagler College students from the spring 2019 semester were explored.  In this phase of the report, this same sample of 150 students will be divided into two smaller samples. The two samples are the sample of Flagler College students who grew up in a coastal region and the sample of Flagler College students who did not grow up in a coastal region.  For purposes of this report, the two samples will be defined with a simple phrase. The term “Coastal Students” will define the sample of those Flagler College students who did grow up in a coastal region and the term “Non-coastal Students” will refer to the sample of those Flagler College students who did not grow up in a coastal region.  There were 50 Non-coastal students and 100 Coastal Students sampled.


<result1>


Students surveyed answered many other questions.  They reported on how many dramatic climactic events they believed occurred in their lifetime, whether or not they agree with the U.S. pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord, and if climate change is a result of the earth’s natural cycle or if it is human made.  In this report, three comparisons will be investigated. First, a comparison will be made between the number of dramatic climactic events they believed occurred in their lifetime between the Coastal and Non-coastal Students. Then, the responses to whether or not they agree with the U.S. pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord will be compared between Coastal and Non-coastal Students.  However, the majority of results in this survey were not similar, so the graphs and summary stats provided may be affected.


Comparison #1: Number of Dramatic Climactic


The following stacked boxplots and corresponding summary statistics represent the number of dramatic climactic events for the Coastal Students and the Non-coastal Students.  It is unclear whether the outliers seen in the boxplots are a result of misunderstanding of the question, or if they truly do believe that there are that many dramatic climactic events in their lifetime.


Overall, there seems to be a slightly noticeable difference in the number of dramatic climactic events in the lifetimes of Coastal and Non-coastal Students. The median number of climactic events is slightly higher for those who lived in a coastal region rather than those who didn't. Though this separation does not seem to be as large as one might expect, as there are more hurricanes that impact coastal regions. But the separation between the two is not as big as expected, the median for coastal region is 4, while the non-coastal region is 3.


Result 2: Boxplot - Climactic Events in respects to region of living


<result2>

<result3>


Comparison #2: Coastal Region Vs. Agreement with Paris Climate Accord


The following split bar graph shows the difference between living in a coastal region and the agreement with the Paris Accord. It can be interpreted here that there is no effect from living within a coastal region to the agreement with the Paris Accord for climate change. It shows that about 70% of both groups disagree with the Paris Climate Accord, and about 30% of the other groups agree with the Paris Climate Accord. As seen here, regardless on whether or not a student lives in a coastal region, it has little to no effect on the opinions of the Paris Climate Agreement.  

<result4>


Comparison #3: # of Dramatic Climactic Events in a student’s Lifetime

 

The contingency table below compares the responses of how many people believe that climate change is manmade compared to if they live in a coastal region or not.  Overall, only 28 out of the 150 students surveyed believe that climate change is a natural cycle while 122 believe that it is a human made process. Thus, 81.1% of students, believe that climate change is human made, while only 18.7% believe that it is a natural cycle. Of those who lived in coastal regions 81% (81/100) believed that it is human made, this closely mirrors the 78% that believe it is human made of those who lived in non coastal regions. These results a very low correlation between the belief of human made climate change and the region of living.

 

Result #5: Contingency table (With data) - Coastal Region Vs. Belief

<result5>

Conclusion:

In these comparisons, it is shown that there is a just noticeable difference between coastal and non-coastal students and the number of dramatic climactic events. There was little to no effect between living in a coastal region and agreement/disagreement with the Paris Climate Accord. The contingency table showed that there was a low correlation of human made climate change with the region of living. In conclusion, the comparisons of Paris Climate Accord, number of dramatic events, and belief of climate change did not show a big effect through the coastal or non coastal region of where the students live.


<data1>

Result 1: Did you grow up in a coastal region?   [Info]
Right click to copy



Result 2: # of climactic events and coastal residencies   [Info]
Right click to copy



Result 3: Summary Stats for coastal region & dramatic climactic events   [Info]

Summary statistics for # of Dramatic Climactic Events in Life Time:


Group by: Coastal Region
Coastal RegionnMeanMedianMinMaxQ1Q3IQR
No505.363.5025187
Yes1006.01402527.55.5



Result 4: Coastal Region vs Paris Climate Accord   [Info]
Right click to copy



Result 5: Contingency table (with data)   [Info]

Contingency table results:


Rows: Coastal Region
Columns: Human Made or Natural Cycle
Human MadeNatural CycleTotal
No391150
Yes8317100
Total12228150

Chi-Square test:


StatisticDFValueP-value
Chi-square10.548887590.4588