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Created: Feb 9, 2013
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Summary of Top 15 NFL Passers 2002,2007,2012
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Based on the graphical summaries we can determine that the top 15 passing yardage increased slightly between 2002 and 2007, but it took a significantly larger jump between 2007 and 2012. From the histograms all three data sets appear to be skewed right, but once the box plot is checked we find that 2002 and 2012 are both roughly symetrical (The column statistics support this). The data set for 2007 is skewed right (box plot and column statistics support this). Their is one outlier in the 2007 data set (we could compute upper fence to verify this).

The mean passing yardage in 2002 was 3692.33 yards; the median passing yardage was 3658 yards. The standard deviation was 469.74 yards; the IQR was 789 yards (the middle 50% of passing yardage leaders in 2002 were within 789 yards of one another).

The mean passing yardage in 2007 was 3870.53 yards; the median passing yardage was 3693 yards. The standard deviation was 518.80 yards; the IQR was 590 yards (the middle 50% of passing yardage leaders in 2007 were within 590 yards of one another). It appears that 2007 had the more consistant yardage totals, but the mean was significantly skewed by the outlier. 

The mean passing yardage in 2007 was 4356.53 yards; the median passing yardage was 4295 yards. The standard deviation was 480.91 yards; the IQR was 879 yards (the middle 50% of passing yardage leaders in 2007 were within 879 yards of one another).

Though 2002 and 2012 appear roughly symetrical they would likely fail the empirical rule due to a possible mild right skew.

I did not do a stem and leaf plot for this data, the results were confusing and did not greatly aid the report (due to the numbers being in the thousands the graph was not helpful).

All data was pulled from ESPN.com statistical passing leaders.

 

Result 1: Histogram 2002 Passing Yardage   [Info]
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Result 2: Histogram 2007 Passing Yardage Leaders   [Info]
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Result 3: Histogram 2012 NFL Passing Yardage Leaders   [Info]
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Result 4: Boxplot 2002,2007,2012 NFL Passing Leaders   [Info]
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Result 5: Column Statistics 2002,2007,2012 NFL Passing Leaders   [Info]
Summary statistics:
Column n Mean Variance Std. Dev. Median Range Min Max Q1 Q3
2002 15 3692.3333 220660.23 469.74487 3658 1569 3120 4689 3284 4073
2007 15 3870.5334 269155.56 518.80206 3693 1781 3288 5069 3448 4038
2012 15 4356.533 231280.69 480.9165 4295 1475 3702 5177 3948 4827

Data set 1. 2002,2007,2012 NFL Passing Leaders   [Info]
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<A href="http://www.statcrunch.com/5.0/viewreport.php?reportid=29683">Summary of Top 15 NFL Passers 2002,2007,2012</A>

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By msullivan13803
Feb 20, 2013

nice report
By ssansass@gmail.com
Feb 10, 2013

[Markas Sergalis] The comment made previously forgot to add name.
By ssansass@gmail.com
Feb 10, 2013

I have no knowledge about football, but from your Histograms I can see that passing yardage definitely improved with time. Why would it though?
By mpicard@stu.jjc.edu
Feb 9, 2013

The jump from 2007 to 2012 really highlights the pass heavy offenses that the NFL teams are running the past couple years. It would be interesting to see the data from another 10 years back when running was the focus of just about every offense.

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