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About this tool
Google maps are awesome, but it can be difficult to create a Google map with interesting statistical features for multiple locations. This tool allows you to quickly create such a map by pasting data. See the FAQ below for detailed formatting instructions. StatCrunch will automatically format and load information into this tool.

Example output
Google plotter
Legend will appear here.
Input:

Location information:

Clustering:
Cluster locations that are close together

Legend title:

Optional legend information:

Google Plotter FAQ
  1. How much does it cost?
  2. What are the terms of use?
  3. How should data be formatted?
  4. How does StatCrunch work with this tool?
  5. Is there a limit on the number of locations that can be plotted?
  6. How do I include a map generated with this tool on my web page?
  1. How much does it cost?

    Absolutely nothing!

  2. What are the terms of use?

    This software is provided without any warranty whatsoever, expressed or implied. Integrated Analytics LLC disclaims any warranty that this software will be free of errors or any other defect of any kind. If something blows up, don't blame us. If you save a map generated from this tool for use on your web site, Google has restricted terms of use for their Maps API.

  3. How should data be formatted?

    There are three inputs to Google plotter: location information, legend title and optional legend information.

    The location information should consist of one location per line. Each line can have up to three pieces of "|" delimited information. The first piece contains either a structured address or geographical coordinates (latitude longitude) for the location. The second piece specifies the marker color in hex format, and the third piece contains additional information about the location that will be displayed when a user clicks on the location marker. The color and additional information inputs are not required. If a color is not specified, a default red marker will be used to plot the location. Try pasting the example information below into the location input above, and then click Plot locations.

    New York, New York||Big city
    Arkansas|#0000FF|The land of opportunity
    30.582241 -96.289328|#800001|Gig'em Aggies!!!!
    The legend title has by default the value "Legend" which will be used if no other value is specified. If the optional legend information is omitted, the legend will contain a linked list of locations. When a user clicks a link, the information about that location will be displayed. Each line entered for the optional legend information will translate into a row in the plot legend. Each line may consist of up to three pieces of "|" delimited information. The first piece will define the color in hex format for the row. The second piece contains the text label for the row, and the third piece contains a space delimited list of indexes associated with the row. The index information is optional with the first location corresponding to an index of 0 rather than 1. If indexes are specified, the legend row will contain a check box which will allow the user to toggle the display of the associated markers. Try pasting the example location information above and the example legend information below into the appropriate fields above, and then click Plot locations.
    #FF0000|Been there|0
    #0000FF|Born there|1
    #800001|Live here|2
    Note that it is up to the user to make sure that the legend colors match the location colors!

  4. How does StatCrunch work with this tool?

    StatCrunch will allow you to load your location information from either a text or Excel file. Using the Graphics > Map > Google option, you can easily select columns in your data set which will be used to create information which will be loaded automatically into this tool. You can also save your map to your StatCrunch My Results folder and share it with others. For more information on a StatCrunch subscription see statcrunch.com.

  5. Is there a limit on the number of locations that can be plotted?

    Theoretically no. However, you will notice that the creation of the map will get a bit slow if you have more than a few hundred locations. Also, if you specify locations with structured addresses rather than coordinates, Google translates (geocodes) the address into coordinates. Google limits each IP address to 15,000 geocode requests per day. A map is saved with coordinates so that future geocoding is not required.

  6. How do I include a map generated with this tool on my web page?

    After a map is created, a text box with the html code for a web page containing the map will be displayed. Simply copy/paste the code into an html file on your web server. You will need a Google Maps API key for the map to work on your server. The api key should replace the existing key shown in the html code. You can embed the result in other Web pages using an IFRAME as shown below.

    <IFRAME src="you_html_file_location" width=680 height=325 frameborder=0 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0 scrolling=no></IFRAME>
    Note that if you have a StatCrunch account, you can save a map to your My Results folder. If you share the map, you can simply click the Embed link on the result page to obtain the IFRAME code.


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